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JPavani

Monte Roraima


Mount Roraima is a mountain located in South America, on the triple border between Brazil, Venezuela and Guyana. It constitutes a tepui, a type of mount ...
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Mount Roraima is a mountain located in South America, on the triple border between Brazil, Venezuela and Guyana. It constitutes a tepui, a type of mount in format of table quite characteristic of the plateau of the Guianas. Bordered by cliffs of about 1,000 meters high, its plateau presents a totally different environment from the rainforest and the savannah that stretches at your feet. Thus, the high rainfall index promoted the formation of pseudocarts and numerous caves, in addition to the soil leaching process. The flora has adapted to these climatic and geological conditions with a high degree of endemism, where several species of carnivorous plants are found - that extract of the insects captured the nutrients that are lacking in the soil. The fauna is also marked by a marked endemism, especially between reptiles and amphibians. This environment is protected in Venezuelan territory by the Canaima National Park and in the Brazilian territory by the Monte Roraima National Park. Its culminating point rises in the extreme south, in the Venezuelan state of Bolivar, to 2810 meters of altitude
Known to Westerners only in the nineteenth century, Mount Roraima was first scaled in 1884 by a British expedition led by Everard Ferdinand im Thurn. However, despite several subsequent expeditions, its fauna, flora and geology remain largely unknown. The story of one such incursion inspired Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to write the book The Lost World in 1912. [1] With the development of tourism in the region, especially since the 1980s, Mount Roraima has become one of the Most popular destinations for trekkers due to the unique environment and relatively easy access and climbing conditions. The most used route is made by the south side of the mountain, [note 2] through a natural passage at the edge of a cliff. The escalation by other points, however, requires a lot of technique, but allows the opening of new accesses.
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