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Gateway to the Blues



Once a train depot in Tunica, Mississippi, this building is now a museum that pays homage to the Blues and welcomes visitors to the Mississippi Delta.
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Once a train depot in Tunica, Mississippi, this building is now a museum that pays homage to the Blues and welcomes visitors to the Mississippi Delta.

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Editor's Choice
Peer Award
Magnificent Capture
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Absolute Masterpiece
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Superb Composition
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Outstanding Creativity
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Neon Lights Photo ContestTop 30 class

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2 Comments | Report
Safetygal PRO
 
Safetygal Nov 11
Very nostalgic, I like it!
cavazbe PRO
cavazbe Nov 12
Thank you, Ginny!
kjfishman
 
kjfishman Nov 12
Great capture adding Tunica to my road trip list.
cavazbe PRO
cavazbe Nov 12
Thanks Kent and just know that there isn't much down here in the Delta Blues, but beauty is in the eye of the beholder!

Behind The Lens

Location
I took this photo in Tunica, Mississippi.
Time
This photo was taken on July 21, 2017 at 8:42 PM in the middle of the hot, humid, and mosquito-filled Mississippi summer.
Lighting
When I set out to take this photo, the sky looked like it was going to just right for a big-cloud filled sunset. Unfortunately, by the time I got to the scene, the clouds rolled away, and I was left with a blank sky. So...instead of giving up, I tried for a blue hour shot.
Equipment
I traveled light for this shot, so I had my Canon 5D Mark IV, my go-to EF 16-35 f/2.8L II USM lens, a Really Right Stuff tripod & ball head, and a remote shutter release cable. I kept things simple because I was only shooting this building.
Inspiration
At the time I took this photo, I discovered and was experimenting with time blending blue hour shots and couldn't wait for the right conditions or location. I intended to capture the sky at sunset and shoot through the blue hour long enough for the lights to come on, but not dark enough to lose usable light. Despite the setback, I pressed on and kept on clicking away until I lost all usable light and made sure to capture that short time where natural and artificial light blended were playing well together.
Editing
Time blending can require some intensive post-processing. For this image, I started with the base image (building, lights, sky) and corrected for lens perspective. Once I got everything aligned, I brought bracketed photos for the neon sign to make sure the letters weren't blown out and after I had everything blended, I made local and global adjustments for lights and shadows and did some dodging and burning to get the photo how I wanted it. I used Photoshop and Lightroom for post-processing software.
In my camera bag
I usually carry my Canon 5D Mark IV, the 16-35 f/2.8L USM II and the 24-70 f/2.8L in my bag. Occasionally the 70-200 f/2.8L IS USM II will make it into my pack if I feel like carrying the extra weight. One of two tripods will come with me: the Really Right Stuff TVC-33 or the lighter TQC. A must in my bag is a roll of gaffer's tape.
Feedback
Shooting in the blue hour does require planning, patience, and being not afraid to fail. I have had successes and failures--and the frustration that follows--since taking this shot. I am currently dealing with the frustrating part of all aspects of photography and there are times when I want to delete all my photos and sell my gear and be done, but I keep coming back to photography because I enjoy it and am inspired by other photographers. My advice is to keep at it no matter how discouraged or frustrated you may be. Just like me, you will push through it and enjoy being creative.

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