JeffreyDeCristofaro
JeffreyDeCristofaro

Stroll Through Spring



A view of the patio of the Richmond Hill Inn, which was destroyed by fire in 2009. I had been there as part of an assignment for an Arts & Crafts course dur...
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A view of the patio of the Richmond Hill Inn, which was destroyed by fire in 2009. I had been there as part of an assignment for an Arts & Crafts course during the spring of my Junior year at UNC-Asheville, and following the disaster have preserved my shots of the location to preserve its beauty.
Photo © Jeffrey DeCristofaro 2007.
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Awards

Peer Award
WillemS alexlevinsky dArtDigital photoABSTRACTION moultriecoso issievanderlith nornots +21
Superb Composition
cristinacovas Rosley cometolifephotography tracyburroughsbrown PeggyAnn1953 Whitehorse_Images pozofolio +20
Top Choice
larrywelch BOULENGER whitedeer susanplss-bryant momo1234 gaetanstjacques BigLen +13
Absolute Masterpiece
raekanahime wendyroske_9600 Sandyj87 mishholland JoanneMarie deenieoc blake5272 +5
All Star
InnateArtist 0000000011111111111111111 trentramsey_photography lindaabnett
Outstanding Creativity
mhaeri sallyG11
Superior Skill
marysanfilippo
Magnificent Capture
efimbirenbaum

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Inspiring Landscapes Photo ContestTop 30 class
The Colors Photo ContestTop 10 class
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Social Exposure Photo Contest Vol 7Top 10 class
Covers Photo Contest Vol 37Top 30 class
Spring Photo Contest 2017Top 10 class
Social Exposure Photo Contest Vol 7Top 10 class week 1
Covers Photo Contest Vol 37Top 20 class week 2
Spring Photo Contest 2017Top 10 class week 1
Covers Photo Contest Vol 37Top 20 class week 1
Architectural Masterpieces Photo ContestTop 10 class
My Best Shot Photo Contest Vol 2Top 20 class
Architectural Masterpieces Photo ContestTop 10 class week 1
My Best Shot Photo Contest Vol 2Top 20 class week 2
My Best Shot Photo Contest Vol 2Top 20 class week 1
Composition Techniques Photo ContestTop 30 class
Composition Techniques Photo ContestTop 20 class week 2
Composition Techniques Photo ContestTop 20 class week 1
Layers and Rule Of Thirds Photo ContestTop 20 class
Layers and Rule Of Thirds Photo ContestTop 20 class week 2
Layers and Rule Of Thirds Photo ContestTop 20 class week 1
Freshmen 2016 Photo Contest Vol 2Top 10 class
Freshmen 2016 Photo Contest Vol 2Top 30 class week 2
Worldscapes Photo ContestTop 30 class
Worldscapes Photo ContestTop 20 class week 2
Worldscapes Photo ContestTop 20 class week 1

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1 Comment | Report
lkspencer
 
lkspencer May 03, 2016
nice place to relax....tack sharp and nice depth and frame

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Behind The Lens

Location
This was a view of the gardens behind the Richmond Hill Inn in Asheville, North Carolina during the spring of April 2007. I had gone there as part of a assignment for a UNC-Asheville arts and crafts course I was taking as a junior undergrad. The cherry blossoms at this time had fully bloomed and were about to drop off. Two years later the entire estate was tragically destroyed in a fire (the cause of which is unknown) - this photo, along with several others I had taken, are now all that remain of the historic location and my experiences there. I have already submitted them to Ramsey Library as part of its City of Asheville historic preservation program and still have the original files intact.
Time
This was during the early afternoon - the sun was directly overhead.
Lighting
I prefer to use natural lighting, which is easier to adjust in post-processing. Also, natural lighting works particularly well in fully-developed seasonal settings, with the exception of winter - it helps to capture the colors just right while maintaining the original properties of the objects caught on-camera. I can use artificial lighting for studio settings, but even then I would like to make it look like natural lighting was used so the photo doesn't look artificial to begin with. I also prefer natural settings to studios - outdoor panoramic and portrait shots allow for the proper balance of lighting with foreground, background and subject details.
Equipment
Kodak CX7430 Zoom Digital Camera. This shot was taken long before I moved to point-and-shoot and professional-type DSLR Hi-Def equipment.
Inspiration
I like pictures that have the composition and poetry of canvas paintings, particularly the ones I used to learn about from reading in school, or from going to art and art history museums, so I made it a rule to shoot like I was painting - properly balanced composition, lighting, focus, etc. Also, when shooting I like to try to find a shot that needs minimal post processing, as though I were a painter who was doing the proper brush strokes on a canvas and had to get it right the first time, with minimal touch-ups over botched spots.
Editing
Merely toned the highlights down to enhance both foreground and background details.
In my camera bag
Before, when I took this photo, I had to have one camera in a small blue pack worn around my shoulder, with extra cards and disposable batteries. Now that I am moving up to pro-level, I like to have my Nikon D7100 with three lenses. extra cards ranging from 32 to 64 GB each, microfiber cloths, my point-and-shoot Canon SX40 camera for back-up (whenever I have to use my Nikon for video while shooting stills or have to shoot stills using two cameras simultaneously), a tripod, and extra batteries along with charger. I also make it a rule to have a far-shooting lens (55-300mm) attached to my camera, so that if I saw something far away while driving, I could stop and shoot without having to change lenses.
Feedback
Don't shoot, paint! What really makes a photo stand out is if it has the qualities of the canvas paintings of all pre-photography eras, particularly the works of the old Masters. You need to have good lighting, composition, timing... and no shortage of detail in your photography! Once you see something that stands out from the rest, and can capture it in a way that makes the scene stand out from other photos, you have to try to keep the original captured shot as you found it, with minor or no adjustment to the original image as a challenge in your craft.

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