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Majik756

Young Barred Owl



Stopping for a few moments between its hunt for food, a young Barred Owl strikes a reflective pose.

Stopping for a few moments between its hunt for food, a young Barred Owl strikes a reflective pose.
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Top ClassTM

Inspired By The World Photo ContestTop 10 class
Inspired By The World Photo ContestTop 10 class week 1
Picturing Other Species Photo ContestTop 10 class
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Anything Animals Photo ContestTop 10 class week 1
ViewBug Photography Awards 2018Top 10 class
ViewBug Photography Awards 2018Top 10 class week 2
ViewBug Photography Awards 2018Top 10 class week 1
Unique Sceneries Photo ContestTop 10 class
Unique Sceneries Photo ContestTop 10 class week 2
Unique Sceneries Photo ContestTop 10 class week 1
World Photography Day Photo Contest 2018Top 10 class
World Photography Day Photo Contest 2018Top 10 class week 2
World Photography Day Photo Contest 2018Top 10 class week 1
2 Comments | Report
Alfredo_Jose
 
Alfredo_Jose May 22, 2018
Beautiful photograph.
RamyDelariarte
 
RamyDelariarte May 23, 2018
Awesome

Behind The Lens

Location
I captured this shot at the Beidler Forest Audubon Swamp in South Carolina. I am not certain, but I do believe that the owl was almost as curious of me as I was of it!
Time
I set off for the swamp as early as I could. I wanted to be the first person, before too many people and too much noise chased all the more timid creatures away. I always wear a soft soled shoe so that as I carefully walk the elevated boardwalk over the swamp I make as little noise as possible. The animals and birds are all just starting to stir, so why rush about and scare them.
Lighting
I choose not to carry a flash in the swamp, but opt to work with the natural ambient light that filters down from the canopy above. I feel it gives more true and real colors and hues to the photos. Sometimes there is a pervasive green tint, but in real life the swamp is mostly green everywhere!
Equipment
I love my Nikon D750! I carry a Nikon 200 x 500 mm lens most times (with a 2x teleconverter in my pack if I need extra reach.) I attach both to a carbon fiber tripod for the needed stability of the long lens. This is all wonderful . . . until the Owl quietly swoops in and lands six feet away . . . and you find yourself stepping back to be able to get the shot in focus!
Inspiration
I love photographing Owls. Well maybe that isn't really it . . .I love finding and photographing Owls!! They are elusive and stealthy, and they leave very few traces to follow. Their range can be miles wide and they do not seem to follow any set patterns. So . . . when I get a chance to have one up close and personal, like in this photo, it is a thrill and an honor.
Editing
I try to use minimal processing for my photos when I can. I process in Lightroom CC first then take the photo to Photoshop for fine tuning. I really like the dehaze adjustment in Lightroom and find it useful for most all my work.
In my camera bag
My bag is simple and carries more food and water then camera gear. Swamps can be damp and muddy, so a lot of wipes to keep the camera and lenses clean are a must, as is a good rain cover and rain coat. My go to lens is the Nikon 200 x 500 mm (i used to carry the Tamron 150 x 600 mm but it was too heavy and for the most part a bit of overkill. Most of the creatures that inhabit the swamp are all going to be between 5 feet and fourty feet away. Outside 40 feet and they quickly disappear into the foliage.
Feedback
When working with a wild subject, like this Owl, all you can hope for is that it will cooperate with the light. You probably have the lens and camera, your ISO and depth of field can be quickly adjusted, but if the subject flies or lands in the shadows, or the bright light, or worse yet it lands in shadow with the bright light behind it, you are out of luck! Be prepared to move quickly and quietly, if you can, to bring the subject to the light you desire . . . and grab the catch light in its eyes!

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