OliverJacobsen
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OliverJacobsen August 24, 2017
Thanks for all the feedback! Positive or critique responses would help me advance my knowledge.

NYC “The Wedge”



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Awards

Contest Finalist in Night Wonders Photo Contest
Peer Choice Award
Peer Award
+40
Absolute Masterpiece
Top Choice
Superb Composition
All Star
Outstanding Creativity
Genius
Superior Skill
Magnificent Capture

Submitted to Photo Contests

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Behind The Lens

Location
I bought my first “real” tripod in New York City last year when I was really advancing my skills as a photographer. Amazed by the busy, bustling, and beautiful big city, I sought to use every chance I had to get “The Shot” using my new gear. Everyone has “The Shot,” the one picture that you spent so much time on and are committed to and just when things are looking bleak, there it is... The Shot. This was that shot for me in Manhattan
Time
Believe it or not but I took this photo in the early evening/late afternoon. I wanted to achieve the effect of moonlit clouds in the night but unfortunately it was a new moon so the clouds weren’t too visible at night. Instead, I spent hours in Lightroom to make my photo turn into what I saw the building had looked like the previous night with the added effect of an artificial “full moon”.
Lighting
Every light source in my photo was a result of my need to replicate an image in my head of what I wanted this to look like. The image was part imagination and part memory but it was very clear what I needed my image to look like. I knew that jo photo like this had ever been taken o this building and I looked to change that. Working on this project really helped to advance my understanding of lighting and editing techniques as trial and error paved the way to a finished photograph.
Equipment
Since I took this photo at day time with the goal of making it look like night, I used my old (now forever lost) camera and wide angle lens on a tripod. I slowed the shutter speed significantly and brought my aperture to f/16. Later, in post, I began the process of making my photo appear as it does today using Adobe Lightroom
Inspiration
Online, you can find thousands of brilliant night photographs that seem to bring life out of nothing with very complicated lighting texhniques and timing of events. My main goal was to find out a way to make my own version of a architectural night photo using only the skills I had and trial and error.
Editing
After returning to California, I hopped on the couch and began hours on Lightroom to create this photo. Being my first major photograph to manipulate in this way, it took quite some time to figure out how to make it look like I wanted it to. Eventually I had a system down to layer individual windows to make it seem like there were dozens of rooms with “Edison lightbulbs” as I imagined it. I wanted a soft orange glow that really brings out the detail of the bricks on the building.
In my camera bag
People say I’m over prepared for anything that may come my way but the amount of equipment I carry in my camera bag is actually somewhat minimal. I carry my Nikon D7200 with a Sigma ART 50mm f/1.4 prime lens, my Vanguard Alta Pro 263 AT tripod, and GoPro HERO4 Session. I may bring a flash depending on the conditions but that’s about it. However, I’ve done long backpack trips carting my very heavy tripod, camera, lens, and GoPro to get that perfect shot and I’ll go to extreme levels to keep my gear with me
Feedback
Patience is key. Often as I have my shot set up “perfectly” and I’m patiently waiting for a moment to take my photo, I’ll notice that there are other vantages where I could change my composition or something new and interesting enters my frame if I were only to adjust. Giving each shot time and deliberate thought will be very rewarding later when you take a step back and see how you did.

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