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SimonArron

Siren call



The robin's distinctive trill abounds in the UK at present, as the breeding season looms. Unperturbed by loitering humans, this one was taken in Kelsey Par...
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The robin's distinctive trill abounds in the UK at present, as the breeding season looms. Unperturbed by loitering humans, this one was taken in Kelsey Park, Beckenham, UK. Lens: Nikkor 300mm f4
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Awards

Peer Choice Award
Contest Finalist in Birds On Branches Photo Contest
Peer Award
gerrycanon lenaavalon jaroslavsame mantequillas Kgalea Crittero Jaspa +48
Top Choice
americorocha barbaranelson Mikhailan Wilderspin Omegr Down2Earthtravelinspirer SueColman +5
Superb Composition
john_arsenault DanieTerblanche Merlot cohooper Gilleroo1 mavishageman Skippy31 +4
Absolute Masterpiece
ricrog michellenyss rose12 FMarlatt Aeri thecatsmeow grayfriday +1
Magnificent Capture
enriquekapie DavidMBuckwalter sue-zon alef0 rachelhelenhudson EdieObscura johannesoehl +1
All Star
onyanita sallyG11 countryside Lanky44Lanky442 jgalarza70 Danny_Row
Outstanding Creativity
DenisT

Top ClassTM

Anything Birds Photo ContestTop 10 class
Birds On Branches Photo ContestTop 10 class
Birds On Branches Photo ContestTop 10 class week 1
Image Of The Month Photo Contest Vol 20Top 20 class
Image Of The Month Photo Contest Vol 20Top 10 class week 2
Image Of The Month Photo Contest Vol 20Top 10 class week 1

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7 Comments | Report
katydid1 PRO+
 
katydid1 March 11, 2017
I can almost hear the trill! Wonderful photo!
Neckbone
 
Neckbone March 13, 2017
Nice capture!
Merlot
 
Merlot May 23, 2017
Love this shot
SimonArron PRO+
 
SimonArron May 23, 2017
Thank you all, greatly appreciated. Simon
Daisy00 Premium
 
Daisy00 September 25, 2017
Congratulations on your well deserved award!!
Alwolfe Premium
 
Alwolfe September 26, 2017
Very nice capture!
Mikhailan
 
Mikhailan March 07, 2018
And vocal too.

Behind The Lens

Location
Kelsey Park, Beckenham, UK - a hub of natural beauty that lies just 20 kilometres from central London.
Time
Just after midday. At weekends it's essential to visit Kelsey early to have the best chance of capturing small birds, because it's popular with families and from about 10am it becomes quite busy and, consequently, noisier. Ducks and geese hang around to be fed, but songbirds (even customarily brazen robins) tend to become more reclusive. You have more of a chance during the week, when things are a little less boisterous, and this was taken on a Monday.
Lighting
My movements around the park are usually governed by the availability of natural light - nothing terribly technical.
Equipment
Nikon D800 and Nikkor 300m f4, hand-held.
Inspiration
Since rediscovering cameras (in 2008, after more than 20 years away), I have often been drawn to robins for the simple reason that they are photogenic, easy to locate and often bold enough to allow you to shoot them without needing a 600mm lens and 2xTC. Sometimes, they can come too close for a 300mm lens, so I have to walk away from them to frame the shot...
Editing
Crop, autocorrect in PS Elements (to see whether that makes a positive difference, which it doesn't always), upload...
In my camera bag
Two Nikon bodies - D800 and D700 - plus Nikkor 300mm f4, Sigma 70-200 f2.8, Sigma 24-105 f4 and Sigma 105mm f2.8 macro. That apart, I have a few spare batteries and cards and two Storm Jacket rain covers, which are absolutely brilliant.
Feedback
Keep your ears open... Many birds are heard before they are seen and the robin's distinctive song is a common soundtrack throughout the UK. Once I've heard a robin, I usually pause awhile to pinpoint its location, then move slowly towards it - still maintaining a sensible distance - to assess whether it is perturbed by humans. If it flits into the bushes, I know the answer and leave it to its own devices. If it carries on as before, I will watch for a minute before gently raising my camera and taking a few shots - always one at a time. The sound of photographers using a machine-gun technique irritates me and I suspect would have the same effect on birds. I nearly always shoot at about f4, to reduce the depth of field and separate the subject from potentially distracting background elements.

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