Thank you to all the photographers that shared their photos showing their interpretation of pretty everyday things for a chance to win either a Canon 5D MK III or Nikon D800 cameras. The photos below are great examples of the beautiful things we see around us. A big thank you to guest judge Jon Reid for his collaboration in this contest. Congratulations to all the finalists shown below!

Grand Jury Winner

"It doesn't get more "everyday" than a spoon. Most of us see one every morning at breakfast. Initially, I was confused as to what I was looking at, but when I figured it out, it left me with a punch of impact. It is not just a spoon on an interesting pattern. The pattern has been carefully chosen, with the shape of the spoon repeated in the foreground and then juxtaposed directly opposite the spoon. It is pretty, it is every day and it is a wonderful piece of art." - Jon Reid

Runner Up

"This is another common scene that most of us will see in our everyday lives. The image is a perfect example of balance with the bench balanced by the cloud. The composition is strikingly simple with only four elements. It is almost a painters technique to photography." - Jon Reid

Runner Up

"This is a fairly common, perhaps even mundane subject, so the photographer has done exceptionally well to find a composition that is so graphically strong, simple and striking. With the sunset reflected in the water, the photographer might have been tempted to boost the saturation, but keeping the colours muted helps retain a sense of tranquillity. This image is all about shape and line and the colour compliments rather than detracts from the subject." - Jon Reid

Runner Up

"For a parent, watching a child play is a large part of daily life. This image captures a beautiful moment with a clean composition, perfectly balanced against the setting sun. Notice how the lines of the field extend to the near corners, meaning any other 'normal' composition would have been weaker. The wider, landscape orientated composition gives context and keep the subject centered works in this situation. To top off the composition, the boy's face is hidden with a cap that is full of character. By hiding the child's identity, it makes it possible for many other viewers to substitute their own child into the scene." - Jon Reid

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