johngriffiths
johngriffiths

Elephant, Miniature, Macro



1-87 scale elephant, autumn leaves

1-87 scale elephant, autumn leaves
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Awards

Celebrity Award
Contest Finalist in Image Of The Month Photo Contest Vol 42
Contest Finalist in Inanimate Macro Photo Contest
Peer Award
laureenofscotts Aunto Brigid_Baier MMRicks TLTownsend Komarik Lanfear +14
Outstanding Creativity
Marchella13 Jeorgiabyrd ricklecompte danielhodges fedoratheexplorer mikelson Lichthart +9
Absolute Masterpiece
amycneffmoore pranaypictures Lamproulis Belochka Natala
Top Choice
Omegr Hood
Superb Composition
paulacoxrossi
All Star
jamesjohnston_3471

Top ClassTM

The Beauty Of Autumn Photo Contest 2019Top 10 class
My Best Shot Photo Contest Vol 7Top 20 class
My Best Shot Photo Contest Vol 7Top 20 class week 1
One Photo ContestTop 10 class
One Photo ContestTop 10 class week 1
Social Exposure Photo Contest Vol 20Top 30 class
Social Exposure Photo Contest Vol 20Top 20 class week 1
Image Of The Month Photo Contest Vol 42Top 10 class
Image Of The Month Photo Contest Vol 42Top 10 class week 2
Image Of The Month Photo Contest Vol 42Top 10 class week 1
Inanimate Macro Photo ContestTop 20 class
Inanimate Macro Photo ContestTop 20 class week 1

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1 Comment | Report
johngriffiths
 
johngriffiths March 10, 2019
Thank you! It was surprising and I am very grateful!

Behind The Lens

Location
The tabletop in this case is a desk that normally sits in front of a large east-facing picture window. I moved the desk away from the window so that the light was coming from behind the camera, and I arranged fall leaves in front of and behind the elephant to give some depth to the view. One leave was curled at just the right angle to engage the elephant's trunk.
Time
The photo was taken after midday when direct sun had left the east side of the house, but the large window still gave ample light to the table.
Lighting
I set up a mirror behind the scene, to reflect light back from the window behind the camera, and then used another hand-held mirror to direct spotlighting onto the subject elephant. The background blur is partly leaves behind the subject and partly reflection from the background mirror.
Equipment
The camera used here, a Canon EOS 60D, was on loan from another family member, who gave it to me to try out. At the same time, I had just acquired a new Canon Macro EFS 35 mm 1:2.8 IS STM lens, and the object of the exercise was to try my hand at using both at once. The camera was tripod mounted, set near the edge of the table, at a height approximating the eye level of the elephant, allowing for some space above and below the subject. The EOS 60D features "Live View" but I was unfamiliar with it and did not use it. Similarily, the EFS 35mm features a lighting ring, but I was unfamiliar with it and did not use it here.
Inspiration
I had the new lens and a new [to me] camera and I wanted a test subject to try out with. I did some other subjects, but I thought the elephant gave the best results for this purpose.
Editing
Because of the close-up nature of the shot, I saw that the model, although very good overall, had, being plastic, some flash remaining on its topside [back], so I used the cloning tool in PS Elements to remove that small blemish.
In my camera bag
My usual kit is two Canon Rebel XTi bodies, one usually mounted with a Canon 70-300 1:4-5.6 IS II USM, the other with a Canon EF 50mm 1:1.8 STM ['Nifty Fifty']. I now frequently use the newer 35mm lens on that body. I also have a Canon EFS 10-22mm 1:3.5-4.5 wide-angle that was gifted to me by a family member who moved up to a full-frame Canon a short while ago. I have not worked extensively with this lens, but I am pleased with some of the work I have done with it so far.
Feedback
I have not done nearly as much tabletop work as I would like to do, and as I intend to do. Setting up a tabletop shot is more art than science, I believe, and with my other interest in scale modelling I aspire to do much more in this area. I think that background is a key element that must be carefully provided for, and I have nothing yet to conclude except that it is necessary to see well beyond the subject to get the right balance. I have almost no experience with artificial studio lighting, preferring instead to try to find a bright overall ambient lighting, and use mirrors or reflectors to 'spot' features.

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