questforwildlife
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PRO
 
p_eileenbaltz August 06, 2017
Stunning image......extraordinary work!
PRO
 
adavies September 01, 2017
Fantastic! Beautiful work! :)
PRO+
 
tmlakshmi December 26, 2017
voted
 
questforwildlife May 04, 2018
Thanks for the comments!
PRO+
 
WolfEyesPhotography May 05, 2018
Gorgeous image!!!
 
Ch3Rpi June 10, 2018
As if she could feel the weight of your stare and had to look where it was coming from.
 
RamyDelariarte June 11, 2018
Stunning
 
davidparkhurst June 11, 2018
So very good
 
questforwildlife June 13, 2018
Thanks again for the comments and kind words.
 
questforwildlife June 19, 2018
Thanks for the votes on the Peoples Choice award!
 
Neckbone Apr 17
Great shot! Congrats!
 
Neckbone Apr 17
Great shot! Congrats!
 
Neckbone Apr 17
Great shot! Congrats!
 
Neckbone Apr 17
Great shot! Congrats!
Thanks!

Guardian of the Clam



"Guardian of the Clam" | Brown Bear & Cubs | Alaska Homestead Lodge | Soldotna | Alaska
Adult Coastal Brown Bears can range in weight from 8...
Read more
"Guardian of the Clam" | Brown Bear & Cubs | Alaska Homestead Lodge | Soldotna | Alaska
Adult Coastal Brown Bears can range in weight from 800-1200 pounds. It's a surreal feeling when you are looking at the bears through the big lens and mom lifts her head and looks directly at you!
Canon 1D X MKII, EF600mm F4 IS, ISO 800, 1/1000 Sec, F8, Manual Exposure, Clean Underwear
www.facebook.com/questforwildlife
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Views

2661

Likes

Awards

People's Choice in Big Bear Photo Challenge
Contest Finalist in Celebrating Nature Photo Contest Vol 4
People's Choice in Wildlife And Water Photo Contest
Contest Finalist in Wildlife And Water Photo Contest
Contest Finalist in Big Mammals Photo Contest
  View more
Peer Award
Absolute Masterpiece
+41
Magnificent Capture
+29
Top Choice
+28
Superb Composition
+23
Outstanding Creativity
+5
All Star
+1
Superior Skill
Virtuoso

Emotions

Happy

Submitted to Photo Contests

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Categories


Behind The Lens

Location
This photo was taken at Lake Clark National Park in Alaska.
Time
Mom and cubs headed for the beach during morning low tide to look for clams.
Lighting
We can't change the tide times but we can certainly position ourselves out there during the golden hour. Fortunately this lined up with low tide and the light was amazing with a beautiful blue colour on the ocean water.
Equipment
I had my Canon 1DX MKII on the tripod with my 600mm F4. No flash was used; just natural morning light.
Inspiration
I stayed at a lodge nestled at the edge of the sedge grass right in Lake Clark National Park accessible only be air or boat. The location is well known in the spring for Grizzly Moms and Cubs. I spent 5 days on foot in the grasses and along the shoreline photographing 3 sows, each with 2 cubs. There were first, second and third year cubs with this pair being third year. I knew the tide would be low that morning and this almost always draws in the bears looking for seafood. I was watching them roam the beach when the 3 of them came together working as a team to dig up a clam. Although I fired off a high speed burst of pics, there was only single frame where the mom bear looked up and made eye contact with the camera.
Editing
The photo was processed for vibrance, noise removal and some cropping. Some minor distracting elements on the beach were removed in Photoshop using the Heal Tool. When I edit photos, I regularly rotate the photo upside down in the final steps. By looking at a photo upside down, it takes away my focus on the personal connection to the photo and brings it to a more technical perspective. From there, I can easily find where my eyes are drawn and often it will be minor distractions that pull me away from the subject. It can be something as small as a little rock off to the side that is reflecting light, or sometimes a larger item that has an overbearing highlight. By following my eyes to these distractions, I can see what I may need to remove or selectively adjust for brightness etc.
In my camera bag
I don't travel light! For this trip, I was carrying 3 camera bodies; 7D MKII, 1DX MKI and 1DXMKII. This was also the trip that I dropped my 7D MKIII camera body in the soaking wet surf sand and completely destroyed it. Fortunately it was towards the end of the trip. All of my lenses are Canon. I had the 600mm F4 that this picture was taken with and I also had the 100-400 F4.5-5.6 Version II (amazingly sharp lens that I use often), a 24-70mm F2.8, 300mm F2.8 and the 1.4x and 2x extenders Version III. I have 2 Gitzo carbon fiber tripods (a smaller lightweight with a center collar and a larger, more stable one without a center collar to help reduce wind vibration). For a tripod head, I normally use a Wimberley Gimbal Head II.
Feedback
Wildlife photography is always an exciting challenge for me. You have to be in the right place and at the right time. Sometimes it's as close as home and other times it will mean travelling thousands of miles. If there is a species that you want to photograph, you have to do your homework as to where to view them and connect with the locals that can get you to the best possible places with the knowledge needed to keep you safe at the same time. If it was too easy, it wouldn't be fun!

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