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Hawaiian Sunset



While watching the sunset on a dinner cruise off of Waikiki beach, this sailboat happened to pass us. Originally shot on 35mm film and scanned from the negative...
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While watching the sunset on a dinner cruise off of Waikiki beach, this sailboat happened to pass us. Originally shot on 35mm film and scanned from the negative.
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1 Comment | Report
AmberDawn1
 
AmberDawn1 February 01, 2019
Beautiful :-)

Behind The Lens

Location
This photo was shot from the deck of a dinner cruise boat, off the shore of Waikiki beach in Honolulu.
Time
This was in the evening, just before sunset.
Lighting
The sun was setting, and the light was getting very orange. The low clouds were creating wonderful contrast, creating a spectacular sunset.
Equipment
This photo was shot on 35 mm film using a Pentax K1000 camera with a Vivitar 28-70 mm zoom lens.
Inspiration
We were on the upper, open-air deck of the boat, enjoying pre-dinner drinks and the part atmosphere as we sailed along the beach. The sunset was spectacular and I was trying to figure out how to best capture it when I saw this sailboat coming the other direction. I waited for it to pass between me and the sunset and then took several shots to bracket the exposure. When I got the film developed, I was quite pleased with this shot.
Editing
This shot was scanned from the film negative and digitally converted to a positive image. I also performed some dynamic range adjustments to improve the contrast a bit, allowing the sailboat to be a bit more visible.
In my camera bag
This photo was shot back in 1997, before digital photography was readily available. Back then I carried by trusty workhorse camera, a Pentax K1000 33 mm film camera. My normal working lens was a Vivitar 28-70 mm zoom, but I also carried a Tamron 70-300 mm lens for telephoto shots. On this trip (which was my honeymoon), I also carried a panoramic disposable camera that produced some surprisingly good shots.
Feedback
Shots such as this have become easier with digital cameras, where you can get immediate feedback about the results of the shot. Back when this was shot, you didn't get to see the results until the film was developed, so you had nothing but experience to guide you as you figured out the exposure and framing. That often meant bracketing shots through a range of exposures, since there would be no second chances. Even today, with digital cameras, using the camera's bracketing features is a good idea, because it allows you to capture a moment over a range of exposures. Given how quickly the light changes at sunrise and sunset, this can make a huge difference in whether or not you get the shot you want.

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