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breaking the horizon on the Chesapeake

breaking the horizon on the Chesapeake
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Contest Finalist in Composition And Leading Lines Photo Contest
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Submitted to Photo Contests

Top ClassTM

Landscapes And Sand Photo ContestTop 10 class
Landscapes And Sand Photo ContestTop 10 class week 1
Subjects On The Ground Photo ContestTop 20 class
Composition And Leading Lines Photo ContestTop 10 class
Composition And Leading Lines Photo ContestTop 10 class week 2
Composition And Leading Lines Photo ContestTop 10 class week 1

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1 Comment | Report
JayneF
 
JayneF June 14, 2018
Breathtaking

Same photographer See all

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Behind The Lens

Location
Sandy Point State Park, just east of Annapolis, MD
Time
Sunrise, just as the sun was breaking the horizon
Lighting
Partly cloudy morning diffusing the light between blue hour and twilight made for great natural light. To temper the brightness of the sun on the horizon, I used a SinghRay DB 4 stop reverse gradient filter and a Lee Big Stopper to achieve the 60 second exposure.
Equipment
This was taken with a Canon 5DMKII and a EF 17-40 f/4L fitted with a Lee Foundation filter holder, Big Stopper and a SinghRay DB rg filter. A Manfrotto 190CXPro as the tripod and remote triggered with a Satechi wireless intervalometer.
Inspiration
Sandy Point at dawn is always a great spot. Multiple jetties and views are available. I have photographed this particular jetty on multiple occasions, and the light is never the same. The clouds were very nice this morning, reflecting the with some nice colors. The clouds were riding on a gentle wind with some movement, not too fast, so a long exposure was in order. I framed this so that the jetty would point to the lighthouse with the clouds framing the lighthouse
Editing
I brightened the FG to bring out the rocks on the beach and darkened the sky to bring out the colors. Some minor structure adjustments and saturation in Photoshop. The filters and exposure did the rest.
In my camera bag
Normally the following; Canon 5DMKII, Canon 7D and occasionally a Life Pixel modified T1i. Canon 17-40 f/4L or 24-70 f2.8L, 70-200 f/2.8L ISII, Canon 50mm f/1.4 Lee Filter system, Lee GND filters, SinghRay RGND Satechi wireless triggers Wrigleys Cobalt gum. Sometimes more, sometimes less, depending on what I want to shoot. On this day, it was just the MKII with the 17-40 f/4L and the 7D with a EF400 f/5.6L, plus my trusty filters.
Feedback
I can't say this enough. Know your location. Get there early and look for new or interesting elements for your foreground. if you are not familiar with the location(s), visit it prior to your shoot, become familiar with it. Keep an eye on the weather. Somewhere between cloudy and partly cloudy is always good, but be prepared for a letdown. It is all about mother nature and her whims.... Get as low to the ground as comfortable when framing. If that doesn't work, start moving your frame upwards until you see what you want. Did I mention tripod? Always use a tripod, and a remote trigger. Wireless is best, but wired will also work. If you have filters, use them. Once the scene is framed, check your exposure, then slide your filter in place and check the exposure again. You will need to adjust the exposure depending on the filter. Start the exposure and be patient. The longer the exposure, the longer the wait. Once exposed, check the histogram and make adjustments for the next exposure as needed. At sunrise, you need to work fast, as the light changes quickly.

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