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magnetic termite mound

Photographing stars you usually need a compass - but not in the Litchfield National Park in the Northern Territory-Australia. Some termites here somehow managed...
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Photographing stars you usually need a compass - but not in the Litchfield National Park in the Northern Territory-Australia. Some termites here somehow managed to use the magnetic field of our earth to build this unique kind of mounds, which are alligned from north to south. They look like flat tombstones, but their secret is that the sun warms up the eastern side first after cold nights, while the midday sun only reaches a small part of it directly - so it never gets too hot inside.
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Absolute Masterpiece
WetPixels tinasch ALF2 antonybarbour _dgs_
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2 Comments | Report
helennormandeau PRO+
 
helennormandeau August 24, 2015
tHIS TECHNIQUE BOTH FASCINATES AND INSPIRES ME. Would you be willing to share with me how you do it, or direct me to a source? Your composition is just so right on!
deannast
 
deannast December 10, 2015
It's not really a 'technique' but a long exposure at night with a tripod and a good camera. Once you get 1-2 good ones you can even add them to other photos if you are good at manipulation