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If Looks Could Kill

A truly upset Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (crotalus atrox) in the Panhandle region of Texas, United States.

A truly upset Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (crotalus atrox) in the Panhandle region of Texas, United States.
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3 Comments | Report
joliver
 
joliver March 03, 2015
this is possible one of the scariest photos iv ever seen. the eyes!!! is that earth in its mouth? WTF?
AllenDouglasPhotos
 
AllenDouglasPhotos February 22, 2016
Snakes have three eyelids, and the eyes are covered by the 3rd eyelid hear. It's nictitating membrane that essentially keeps the animal's eyes clean of debris. Raptors have a similar membrane. The problem here is that the colour cast is not normal. If that's intentional for "effect", OK ... I guess. (Not a fan of skewing colour cast intentionally, but folks do it all the time). Also, if the eyes aren't in focus, the photo is toast. The eyes aren't in focus. Looks like the centre of focus was down the body under the neck of the snake. If the eyes aren't sharp, don't use it.
bpwhite PRO
bpwhite February 22, 2016
The photo hasn't had any post-processing done to it, and it was shot with natural lighting. The eyes are colored that way because the snake was about to shed. Please expound on what you mean by normal color cast. The center of focus for this shot ended up being just behind the eye, with the depth of field extending through the rear two-thirds of the right eye, past the pupil. The cloudy state of the eye, combined with the proximity of the moving snake to my hands/camera made the minor loss of focus on the front third of the eye acceptable to me. Thank you for the critique.
mytmoss PRO+
 
mytmoss February 24, 2016
I do a lot of wildlife photography and often the lighting is less than perfect. If I would suggest anything is that you need a greater depth of field to get the nose in focus. I think it's excellent.
bpwhite PRO
bpwhite February 25, 2016
Thank you for the critique, I will play around with depth of field once summer hits and the snakes come back out