Thank you to all the photographers that shared their best shots showing motion in B&W in this photo contest in collaboration with SpinLight 360®.

"The beauty of black and white photography is in it's skewing of reality, the escape from color offers the photographer a unique opportunity. As a photographer one can utilize the camera to capture moments that happen in real life, but with carful thought these captures can develop into something much more influential then the moment itself. Each of the photographs in the collection absolutely transcend the click of the shutter and each tells its own unique story. The selected images have a unique cache of personality that separate them from the bunch. After carful deliberation these are my selections." - guest judge Dan Hughes 

A special thanks to friend and professional photographer Dan Hughes for his collaboration as a guest judge. Dan Hughes has 5 years of progressive experience in the photographic industry providing photographic education and social media. Dan was director of education at Macphun bringing photographic education and killer photo editing software to anyone and everyone interested in taking pictures.

Grand Jury Winner

"The "Potter" by svetlinivanov, was my first pick from the group after a spending time with each image of the collection. The precision and delicacy of the weathered hands of the unknown potter were the first thing that struck me. The technical aspects of the photograph are well thought out and effective. The angle of view and composition displays the artisan's workspace, stressing the wheel, the pot, and the aforementioned hands in a subtle balance and play of each important element. The short depth of field and the chosen shutter speed displays the motion of the action and focuses the viewers eye to the subject. Even the light toned material on the left side of background breaks up the monotony of the stone walls creating another element to direct the viewers attention. While I can imagine a little sculpting of the light in post processing could help direct the viewers attention even more this photo displays a narrative with just enough to make me want more."- Dan Hughes

Runner Up

""Waterfall portrait" by ovi_craciun is like something I can imagine from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. It has an otherworldly sense of adventure and tension to it. This is a perfect example of grandeur in nature, with the human dwarfed by the massive and dramatic falls."- Dan Hughes

Runner Up

""Cascade" by ericpierce is the calm moment just before the next series of falls. The photograph is metaphor for human life, the tumultuous waterfall in the background is the change in existence, followed by the calm, with the solace of the stone to slow the weary traveler before the next set of waterfalls in the bottom left of the frame. The irony of the image is that there is no human element in the frame. It's just nature and the photographer telling the story. Great care was taken when the photograph was composed as the edges and the corners of the frame is exquisitely balanced around the subject."- Dan Hughes

Runner Up

""20151110-img_5519" by Joyanna is a beautiful intimate moment captured with just enough motion to capture with both detail and movement. The hard contrasty light coming from the doorway offers the studio-esc lighting that reminiscent of the B&W masters. Note the hard light on the subjects legs pairs nicely with the soft diffused light entering the room through the sheer curtains. Instead of the NYC dance studio, the viewer is invited into a residence for a change of setting, giving a little more backstory to the capture. Compositionally the light play with the subject and the reef on the door draws the viewer in, the light switch on the left breaks up the otherwise single tone wall and blacked out couch on the right push the viewers attention to the dancer."- Dan Hughes

Amateur Winner

People's Choice

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist

Finalist