We're just a few days away from celebrating 4th of July, which means it's fireworks time! Today we want to showcase a handful of photos shot by ViewBug members and show you how these photographers captured these cool shots.

"B-25 Fireworks" by kenmcall

Location
This photo was taken at the 2015 Abbotsford Airshow in Abbotsford, BC. I've been attending this airshow since I was a kid, and for the past three years I've been invited to participate as part of an annual BC photography competition sponsored by the airshow. There are a lot of great perks to being invited—free admission, free food, a special "photo pit" viewing area—but possibly my favourite is the special access we get to the aircraft "hot side", which is normally out of bounds to attendees. The first day of the airshow ends with fireworks, and just for us photographers, the pilot of this B-25 World War 2 era bomber fired up the engines for us. The combination of classic aircraft, spinning propellers, and fireworks made for a photo combination that would be nearly impossibly to get under any normal circumstances.

Time
The photo was taken between 9:30 and 10 pm.

Lighting
The photo was taken using whatever light was available, which in this case wasn't much. The plane itself was quite dark, and most of the light comes from the fireworks. I set my shutter speed for 10 seconds, which was enough to trace the path of the fireworks in the sky and to gather enough light to somewhat illuminate the plane.

Equipment
I used a Nikon D7000 camera with a 18-105mm lens, mounted on a tripod. Since I was shooting fairly low to the ground (and because I have a messed-up back) I also used a Camranger connected to my iPad to help with composition and easier control of the camera.

Inspiration
During my first year of taking part in the photo competition I was unable to make it to the aircraft hot side to take photos during the fireworks. When I saw some of the photos the other photographers were getting, I knew I had to be there next year. The opportunity was just too unique to pass up.

Editing
Basic RAW processing, a little colour enhancement, and some significant lightening up of the shadows.

In my camera bag
My Nikon D7000, 35mm, 50mm, and 18-105mm Nikon lenses, and a 70-300mm Sigma. I also carry a Camranger with me pretty much always, a basic Nikon wireless remote control, and a number of filters (UV, polarizer, ND, and graduated ND).

Feedback
Because this is such a unique combination of access and timing, it's hard to give any advice specific to this photo. However, if photography aircraft is of interest, attending airshows is a must. Also, get to know people in aviation. Hang around airports and flight museums. Getting access to shoot aircraft in unique situations typically requires access the general public doesn't have, so having connections within aviation is critical (and is something I'm still working on).

 

"fireworks at wedding party" by PawelJ

Location
This photo was taken at the wedding reception in Poland.

Time
It was nearly midnight. Bride and Groom were asked to step outside to watch the fireworks show organized for them.

Lighting
It's all natural light. I had to set the ISO nearly to maximum (25600)

Equipment
I have used my Canon 5D Mk III and Canon 16-35mm, f2.8 lens.

Feedback
Weddings are the easiest and the most difficult to photograph in the same time. You just have to be everywhere and look around for the best moments.

Inspiration
When I saw all the guests gathering around the couple to look at the fireworks I decided to stand behind them and wait for the best moment.

Editing
There was not much of post-processing done to this picture. The only thing I had to get rid of was the noise on the image as it was very dark when I took this picture and had to set the ISO really high.

In my camera bag
I normally have quite a lot of equipment as I'm a wedding photographer. I have to be ready for different conditions and need spare camera, lenses and flash. My main camera is Canon 5D Mk III. I also have Canon 6D and use it on the day. I use two lenses on a wedding day: Canon 16-35mm f2.8 and Canon 24-70mm f2.8. I also have Canon 85mm f1.2 for the portrait shots and Canon 70-200mm f2.8 IS if I need to keep a distance from the subject. I also have two flash guns: Canon speedlight 600 EX rt and speedlight 580EX just incase the first one fail.

 

"Sydney Fireworks" by NielsFahrenkrogPhoto

Location
At Mrs. Macquaries Point near the Botanical Gardens in Sydney, Australia

Time
Hard to tell, I`d say roughly around midnight

Lighting
I shot in BULB mode to control the exposure exactly and tried to find promising rocket formations. I used my sharpest aperture at f8.0 and an ISO at 125 to have sharp and clear photographs. I waited for the rockets to explode and started the exposure just milliseconds after they had exploded. I stopped the exposure right after the rockets had spread out completely, in this case after 3.2 seconds.

Equipment
I used with my Canon EOS70D with an 18-135mm F3.5 lens on 35mm. I exposed the image for 3.2 seconds, so I had to use my Manfrotto travel and a remote control to avoid any blur.

Inspiration
I am a German travel photographer and know the famous Sydney Firework display for New Years Eve ever since because it is broadcasted every year on German television. When I started to plan my world trip together with my girlfriend back in 2013, the first thing we planned m was to be in Sydney for new Years Eve to shoot the famous firework display.

Editing
The firework lasted for 12 minutes and I shot this photograph at the end of the display. Due to the many minutes of immense firework explosions, there was a lot of smoke in the air. I used the "dehaze" tool in Lightroom to get a clearer image. Afterwards, I worked on the colors, especially on the pinks to show them exactly like I saw them. The boats in the foreground were a bit too dark because they were mainly backlit from the firework show, so I brightened them up a bit.

In my camera bag
I use a Canon EOS70d and my very first EOS450D whenever I need a quick grip to on of my other lenses, which are a 10-18mm Canon f4.5 wide angle, an 18-135mm Canon f3.5 zoom, a 50mm Canon f1.8 and a 75-300mm Canon f4 zoom lens. This covers a range from 10-300mm (Equivalent to 16-480mm on the cropped sensors of both cameras). I use a Manfrotto action tripod a and remote control to shoot long exposures.

Feedback
Shooting firework displays is not easy, especially in Sydney where you have to be on location up to 20 (!) hours in advance for a first-row spot, if you are a normal visiting photographer (There is a small area restricted for media pass holders) When shooting fireworks, you must have a tripod and a remote control to operate your camera without touching to guarantee absolute sharpness. Frame your shot in advance, and look for foreground interest. Straighten the horizon line and avoid aborted architecture, especially when using a wide angle lens. When the show begins, look for the rockets as they are flying towards the sky and start the exposure right after they have exploded in order to avoid their bright explosion to be on the image. You can shoot in manual mode or in Bulb mode to have maximum control. In my experience, a 4-second exposure on ISO 100 and f8.0 will often do a good job. Test your settings in advance and make changes, if required.

 

"Last day of Christmas at the farm" by Iceland

Location
I was born and raised on a farm near Lake Myvatn in North Iceland where this pictures is taken. That night my big family from the farms in the neighborhood came together to celebrate the last day of Christmas. There is an elf bonfire behind the car and my brothers are having fun with Fireworks. I'm not that much into fireworks so silently I walked behind my super-jeep with my tripod and the Nikon.

Time
Þrettándinn, also known as Twelfth Night, is an Icelandic holiday celebrated on January 6. It is the last day of Christmas, and is celebrated with elf bonfires and elf dances. On this day, families get together, have dinner and light fireworks.

Lighting
I didn't prepare for the shot, I didn't have time because the fireworks were over in a short time and it started before I got the idea of getting behind my car to take this photo. I did few shots and I like this one most because of the "star" at the top of the frame, and my family members seen on the right on the photo.

Equipment
This was shot on a Nikon D5300, with a Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC lens. I like that lens very much in various situations in North Iceland.

Inspiration
I decided to bring along my camera and tripod because I wanted to experiment with bonfire, but didn't thing too much about the fireworks. But somehow everything fused together in this photo and quite funny this red firework what seems to come from the hood of the car and reminds me of a Star Wars lightsaber.

Editing
Somehow this picture didn't need a lot of post processing. White balance is as shot, -0,85 exposure, but went wild on the clarity slider. I tent to do that when my super-jeep is involved in pictures :)

In my camera bag
My worn-out bag includes Nikon D5300, two extra batteries, Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC lens, AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II lens, AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor ED 55-200mm F4-5.6G lens, remote shutter, lens cleaning cloths and chocolate. Chocolate is the most essential thing to carry when driving the center highland of Iceland. Of course food, water and other survival essentials are needed, but standing in a great landscape, waiting for the right lighting calls for good Icelandic chocolate.

Feedback
To capture something like this, at a isolated and remote farm, you need to know the locals. I'm available all around the year to assist everyone getting to the places, as seen on my website www.kip.is :) Thank you Viewbug for your website, I had been looking for a long time for a solution for displaying my photos, and Viewbug answered all my questions, simple as that.